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OVSCC November Symposium

November 8 @ 12:00 pm - 6:00 pm
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November Symposium: Women in STEM

Join us for a half day symposium featuring four talented women presenting on women’s role in STEM, as well as recent research topics in cosmetic science!

November 8th, 12-6pm at the Sharonville Convention Center

Keynote Speaker: Rachel Weingarten

Encouraging Women not to be the Hidden Figures in STEM”

Additional Speakers:

-Dr. Harshita Kumari, Assistant Professor, University of Cincinnati; Topic: Nanoscience and Cosmetics

-Dr. Crystal Porter, Associate Director, Chicago State University; Topic: The State of Hair Care for Black Women in the US and Their Unique Struggles

-Dr. Anna D Gudmundsdottir, Professor, University of Cincinnati; Topic: Applications for Solid-State Photochemistry in Relation to Sustainable Chemistry

Cocktail hour will follow the speakers, featuring posters presented by students from the University of Cincinnati and University of Toledo.

Poster Presentations:

-DeVonna M. Gatlin (University of Cincinnati) ; Exploring How Photodynamics of Novel Chemical Filter Additives, Beta-Ketoester Deriviatives, Gives Insight into Developing Safer Sunscreens

-Stephanie Ventura (University of Cincinnati) ; Mechanisms of Surfactant Penetration into Skin From Mixtures of SLES and CAPB

-Sobiya George (University of Cincinnati) ; Wavelength Specific Photo Chemical Synthesis of Chromanones

-Shanin Jacquay (University of Toledo) ; Internship Experience in Product Development and Manufacturing Processes

Abstract: During the summer of 2017, I held a product development internship position at Accupack Midwest, Inc. Accupack Midwest is a small family owned contract manufacturing, filling and packaging company located in Cincinnati, Ohio. The company works with OTC and personal care products. My assigned project for the summer was to develop an anti-aging cream and get it ready for market before the end of the internship. The anti-aging cream had specific requirements, including texture, smell and key ingredients. During the internship I also worked on the Annual Product Review Report, wrote and designed SOP’s and supervised large scale batch size production.

-Melanie Dzyak (University of Toledo) ; Finding Active Ingredient Trends Using Formulating for Efficacy

-Carissa Clift (University of Toledo) ; Can HLD become the new HLB?

-Margaret Gorz (University of Toledo) ; Key Elements that Drive Lip Color Payoff

Abstract: The objective of this work was to determine elements that influence glide, stick strength, and color payoff in lip sticks and develop testing methods for those parameters. In order for a lip product to be successful, it must satisfy customer preferences. Manipulating characteristics of glide, stick strength, and color payoff is necessary in creating a successful product. A texture analyzer was used to collect data regarding lip stick characteristics. Various interactions between oils, waxes, and pigments were observed based on their polarity, chemical structure, and linearity. Data was analyzed using a full factorial design of experiment. This work was done during the summer of 2017 as an Amway intern under mentor Dan Donnelly.

-Sydney Holland (University of Toledo) ; Formulation of a Facial Mask and a Liquid Lipstick Utilizing Silicones

Abstract: This summer, I completed a formulation internship at Wacker Chemie in the Personal Care lab. Wacker Chemie is a raw material supplier focusing on silicones. My two formulation projects of the summer consisted of developing a warming facial mask and a liquid lipstick both utilizing silicones for different properties. My final project was to test sunscreens with silicones to see how it affected SPF

Agenda
12-1pm: Lunch
1-5pm: Speaker Presentations
5-6pm: Cocktail Hour with Poster Presentations

Location
Sharonville Convention Center
1355 Chester Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45246

ABSTRACTS

Encouraging Women not to be the Hidden Figures in STEM – Rachel C. Weingarten
In 1962, John Glenn became the first American to orbit the earth; but who were the women who helped put him there?
The film Hidden Figures told the story of three real-life African-American female pioneers who were referred to as NASA’s human “computers.” Before bits and bytes or hard drives existed, the combined brain trust, calculations and equations of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan, and Mary Jackson allowed Neil Armstrong, Alan Shepard, and John Glenn to travel to the moon and back.
So, have our collective attitudes toward women in the sciences has changed since then? Sadly, not that much.
In 2010, The American Association of University Women (AAUW) compiled a report titled Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). The report listed eight key research findings detailing ways environmental and social barriers- including stereotypes and gender bias, continue to block women’s progress in STEM. But while some of the statistics and findings indeed seem bleak, there is also the desire to create an environment that not only welcomes women in the STEM fields, but in creating environments where young women are sought after and on equal footing with their male counterparts.
In this lively and interactive presentation, Rachel Weingarten will share a timeline that includes lesser known early STEM pioneers and role models including Emilie du Chatelet, Ada Lovelace and Lise Meitner, as well as The Bletchleyettes, The Calutron Girls, Hollywood legend Hedy Lamarr, Estee Lauder, Madam C.J. Walker and more modern unexpected STEM heroes including Girls Who Code, Megan Smith and lesser known Zuckerberg sibling Randi. She’ll also draw parallels between the women who paved the way and the ones who we need to nurture and sustain professionally.
The State of Hair Care for Black Women in the US and Their Unique Struggles – Dr. Crystal Porter
It is estimated that 500 billion dollars is spent annually on hair care in the US. A significant portion of that value is attributed to Black women because they spend 9 times more on their hair compared to the average consumer. Unique grooming practices, the desire to have manageability and diverse styling options are just a few factors that keep Black women searching for the perfect product. However, there is a growing problem which is more significant that drives the boom in hair care sales for this specific population and it is currently being ignored by the hair care industry. This talk will provide an overview of the state of Black hair, discuss trends and attitudes and reveal a growing epidemic that could be a game changer in the world of hair care. A strategy will then be posed to help resolve the #1 need for Black women which is not being properly addressed.
Applications for Solid-State Photochemistry in Relation to Sustainable Chemistry – Dr. Anna D Gudmundsdottir
The quest for sustainable chemistry is reinforcing interest in solid-state photochemistry as a sustainable tool for synthetical applications because organic crystals can be used to carry out photoreactions without solvents and most photoreactions can be initiated by sunlight or photocatalysts.1 In particular, solid-state photoreactions are generally more regio- and stereoselective than their solution counterparts, because the rigid packing of molecules in the crystal lattice prevents significant rotation and diffusion.2 In contrast, recent findings highlight that organic crystals can also be flexible and compression can make them bend, curl, hop, or twist when exposed to light or external pressure.3 Thus, photosalient crystals can convert light into mechanical energy, and they have a potential role in the fabrication of mechanically tunable components for actuation, energy harvesting, flexible electronics, and switchable reflectors. In addition, such crystals can be used as sensors and probes. The quest for sustainable chemistry is reinforcing interest in solid-state photochemistry as a sustainable tool for synthetical applications because organic crystals can be used to carry out photoreactions without solvents and most photoreactions can be initiated by sunlight or photocatalysts.1 In particular, solid-state photoreactions are generally more regio- and stereoselective than their solution counterparts, because the rigid packing of molecules in the crystal lattice prevents significant rotation and diffusion.2 In contrast, recent findings highlight that organic crystals can also be flexible and compression can make them bend, curl, hop, or twist when exposed to light or external pressure.3 Thus, photosalient crystals can convert light into mechanical energy, and they have a potential role in the fabrication of mechanically tunable components for actuation, energy harvesting, flexible electronics, and switchable reflectors. In addition, such crystals can be used as sensors and probes. We have shown that photolysis of vinyl azide derivatives results in formation of triplet vinylnitrenes and N2 gas. The release of N2 molecules from the crystal lattice is distinctive for each vinyl azide derivative. For example, some crystals tolerate a build-up of large N2 bubbles within the crystals before cracking, whereas others shatter fiercely upon exposure to light. The behavior of vinyl azide crystals and their solid-state reaction mechanisms will be discussed and correlated to the vinyl azide crystal packing arrangements.
References
1. (a) Skubi, K. L.; Blum, T. R.; Yoon, T. P., Chem. Rev. 2016, 116, 10035-10074; (b) Staveness, D.; Bosque, I.; Stephenson, C. R. J., Acc. of Chem. Res. 2016, 49 (10), 2295-2306; (c) Schultz, D. M.; Yoon, T. P. Science 2014, 343 (6174).2.   Ramamurthy, V.; Venkatesan, K. Chem. Rev. 1987, 87   (2), 433-481.3.    Naumov, P.; Chizhik, S.; Panda, M. K.; Nath, N. K.; Boldyreva, E. Chem. Rev. 2015, 115 (22), 12440-12490.
Rachel Weingarten Bio
Rachel C. Weingarten is a marketing & brand strategist, trend tracker and analyst, and president of 729.marketing in New York. Rachel is also the author of three award winning non-fiction books including “Hello Gorgeous! Beauty Products in America 40s-60s,” a New York Public Library book of the year and “Career and Corporate Cool” an Entrepreneur magazine and Career Builder pick for most interesting/must read career book of the year. Rachel’s a sometimes professor, teaching personal branding and the history of beauty culture and cosmetic marketing on the graduate and undergraduate levels at New York University and the Fashion Institute of Technology. Rachel’s a former celebrity makeup artist and beauty historian. She’s worked on launches for many drugstore, celebrity driven, prestige and masstige lines of cosmetics and consumer packaged goods. In 2016 Rachel created/taught a program called “From Cleopatra to the Kardashians: a short history of beauty and its influence on the world” at Parsons School of Design in association with luxury umbrella brand LVMH. Rachel’s also a prolific writer who most often writes about business and style and the business of style, for top tier outlets including CNN.com, The Guardian, The New York Times, Parade.com and the Ladders, among others. Rachel created and acted as the on-air talent for a program about female entrepreneurs for CNN called “Enterprising Women.” Tweet with her @rachelcw or find her on Facebook.
Dr. Harshita Kumari Bio
Harshita Kumari received her BS in Cosmetic Science in 2005 and PhD in supramolecular chemistry from University of Missouri, in 2011. She did her postdoc in computational chemistry with Prof. Carol Deakyne. Harshita received RSC Journals Grant for International Authors (2012) and worked as a visiting scientist in Stellenbosch University on crystal engineering and gas sorption properties of frustrated organic solids. She also worked as a visiting researcher in Durham University, UK (2013) on supramolecular gels and in Flinders University, Australia, 2014 on thin film shearing of supramolecular complexes. In 2015, she joined University of Cincinnati as a tenure-track Assistant Professor at James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy. She has keen interest in colloidal chemistry, neutron physics and integrating novel biophysics tools with traditional methods to unravel structure property queries, leading to development of novel skin care, oral care and hair care products. In addition, she probes into mechanisms of delivery and deposition actives onto the skin/hair and elucidate the parameters to control them. Dr. Kumari’s group construct novel nanometric delivery vehicles, based on the principles of self-assembly and molecular recognition.
Dr. Crystal Porter Bio
Dr. Crystal Porter is a hair scientist and owner of Mane Insights, Inc, a company that conducts research to further understand the specific needs of the hair and scalp. As a recognized contributor in the world of hair science, she also provides knowledge about hair to individuals, professionals and industry leaders. She is passionate about debunking myths and empowering others to properly care for their hair.
Dr. Porter spent the majority of her 18-year career at L’Oréal, USA where she managed the Physics Laboratory and Consumer Insights teams to study the biophysical characteristics of hair and pigmented skin within different ethnic groups around the world and to understand behaviors that are related to consumer’s experiences.  During the past fourteen years, she has shared knowledge about ethnic hair to fellow scientists and the public at national and international venues.  She has also contributed to L’Oréal’s global classification of curl in hair and has authored numerous papers, presentations and book chapters on hair straightening and ethnic hair.  Dr. Porter began her career in cosmetic science at Unilever in the year 2000.  While there, she was part of a measurement science group and conducted research for aid-to-formulation.
Dr. Anna Gudmundsdottir Bio
Professor Anna Gudmundsdottir earned her B.S. from the University of Iceland, and her MS and PhD degrees from the University of British Columbia, Canada, with John Scheffer. Afterwards, she headed south to Michigan State University and was a visiting scientist with Peter Wagner, and on her path further south she was a NATO postdoctoral fellow with Matt Platz at The Ohio State University. She joined the faculty at the University of Cincinnati in 1998.  She has received several awards for her research at UC, such as NSF CAREER Award, Japan Fulbright Award, ACS Cincinnati Chapter – Chemist of the year, and she was elected a fellow of the Graduate School at UC.
Her research is centered on determining reaction mechanisms in the solid state and solutions, to better understand how crystal lattices control solid state reactivity and how crystals can be used to turn light into mechanical motion or energy.

Details

Date: November 8
Time: 12:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Event Category: